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    Millennials Strike Back

    Millennials are making their mark on a world that is profoundly different to the one their parents knew.

    Millennials, those born in the final decades of the twentieth century, have had bad press for a long time. Now they are fighting back as they come of age in a world radically changed from that experienced by previous generations.

    Even the oldest were still in primary school when the Soviet Union collapsed, when deregulation swept...

  • Writing Fellowships 2018

    Queensland writing
    fellowships open

    'These fellowships will provide a unique opportunity for Queensland writers.' Editor Julianne Schultz

    Griffith Review is proud to announce its second round of Queensland Writing Fellowships
    Entries are now open, and close on Thursday 31 August. All entrants will be notified of the result of their application by the end of September 2017. Winners will be officially announced at the Queensland Literary Awards on Wednesday 4 October 2017.
    Consult our full Terms & Conditions of entry here.
    To apply, visit our Submittable page here

  • NAIDOC Week 2017

    ‘Not so easy’
    – Kim Scott

    Much can be said of the healing and improved social outcomes for Aboriginal people that can result from reconnection to a pre-colonial cultural heritage. But there may also be the possibility of a wider social transformation in such programs.

    To celebrate NAIDOC Week 2017 (2–9 July), Griffith Review is proud to showcase some the pieces we have published in past editions that relate to this year’s theme, ‘Our languages matter’.

    In Griffith Review 47: Looking West, Kim Scott reflects on his involvement with the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project – a project that recorded and translated oral stories in the Noongar language, and returned them to the regions they originated from.

  • NAIDOC Week 2017

    ‘Wadu Matyidi’ – Buck McKenzie and Eva Hornung

    Wadu matyidi, yakartiapinha – Virdianha, Warrikanha, Unaanha – yarnduiranggadna ardla nhirringa…

    To celebrate NAIDOC Week 2017 (2–9 July), Griffith Review is proud to showcase some the pieces we have published in past editions that relate to this year’s theme, ‘Our languages matter’.

    In Griffith Review 55: State of Hope, Eva Hornung and the late Buck McKenzie tell a new story in the Adnyamathanha language, with the help of artwork from Vishus Productions. ‘My dream in learning [the Adnyamathanha language],’ Hornung reflects, ‘and helping to make these books, was to see all South Australian school children study it and, in doing so, truly begin to know their own country.’

  • NAIDOC Week 2017

    ‘The great upmapping project of 2016′ – Tony Birch

    Birth is never without violence. And settlement would be a breach birth. The Governor of the new colony was a conjurer of tricks. The man dazzled settlers and natives alike with the lie of terra nullius, a foreign tongue found in a book of mythology.

    To celebrate NAIDOC Week 2017 (2–9 July), Griffith Review is proud to showcase some the pieces we have published in past editions that relate to this year’s theme, ‘Our languages matter’.

    In Griffith Review 52: Imagining the Future, Tony Birch weaves a visionary re-imagining of Melbourne pre- and post-European settlement.

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