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Edition 57

Contents
Reportage

Rush to judgement

Stigmatising the homeless in Nowra

NOWRA SHOWGROUND IS a ten-minute walk from the centre of town: past Best & Less, Jolly Olly’s Discount Variety Store, the Postman’s Tavern, the Bowling Club and along a wide, tree-lined residential street. The gateway is a towering, seven-metre-high sandstone structure with four entrance archways, topped by parapets and crenellated towers, built just after World War I. A life-sized bronze statue of a soldier, added after World War II, stands in front of the gate. He’s depicted without rifle or helmet; as local historical material explains: ‘His country’s freedom secured, but forever on alert to safeguard the future.’ Inside is a sprawling seventeen hectares, fringed by eucalyptus bush to the west and the Shoalhaven River to the north. Nowra has been holding its annual country show here, over two days in late summer, since 1887. In the between times, it’s a place where locals walk their dogs and community groups... Read more

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From Griffith Review Edition 57: Perils of Populism © Copyright Griffith University & the author.

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