Claire Aman lives in Grafton, an inspiring town.

Her short stories have appeared in Best Australian Stories 2008 and 2014, New Australian Stories 1 and 2, Escape, Cracking the Spine, The Trouble with Flying, Award Winning Australian Writing, Australian Book Review, Island, Southerly and Heat.

Her stories have won the Wet Ink, EJ Brady and Hal Porter prizes. 

Her writing life has been nurtured by Varuna, the Writers House, and also through an Australian Society of Authors mentorship.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Professor Stephen Garton is deputy vice-chancellor at the University of Sydney.

He is also the author of four books and over sixty articles, chapters and encyclopaedia and historical dictionary entries in such areas as the history of madness, psychiatry, crime, incarceration, masculinity, eugenics, social policy, poverty, returned soldiers, masculinity and sexuality.

Although much of his research focuses on Australia he has researched and published work in relation to British and American history. This research concentrates on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries although on occasion he has ranged more widely.

In addition to being a fellow of a number of learned academies and societies he was awarded the Centenary Medal in 2003 for services to Australian history.

This author has contributed 2 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Tony Davis is based in Sydney. His books include The Big Dry (HarperCollins, 2013), a novel shortlisted in the 2014 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards; Roland Wright (a children’s series published in the US and Germany); Wide Open Road (ABC Books, 2011), the companion book to the ABC documentary; Total Lemons (ABC Books, 2012); and the literary memoir F. Scott, Ernest and Me (Bantam, 2007).

This author has contributed 2 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Al Gore is a former vice president of the United States.

He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2007.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Julian Burnside AO QC is an Australian barrister who principally practises in commercial litigation, trade practices and administrative law. He is also a human rights and refugee advocate, and an author of several books, including Watching Brief: Reflections on Human Rights, Law and Justice (Scribe, 2007).

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Melissa Sweet is one of Australia's most experienced health journalists.

She is author of Inside Madness (Pan Macmillan, 2006) and The Big Fat Conspiracy: How to Protect your Family's Health (ABC Bokos, 2007), and co-author of Ten Questions You Must Ask Your Doctor (Allen & Unwin, 2008), and Smart Health Choices: Making Sense of Health Advice (Hammersmith Press, 2008).

Her work appears in many publications, and she moderates the public health blog, Croakey. She is Secretary of the Foundation for Public Interest Journalism, and hold honorary appointments at the University of Sydney and Notre Dame University (Sydney campus).

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Robyn Williams has presented The Science Show on ABC Radio National since 1975.

He graduated with a Bachelor of Science (Honours) in England. He has served in a number of science related positions including as the President of the ANZAAS Congress in Brisbane and as Chair of the Commission For The Future.

In 1988, he received Honorary Doctorates in Science from the Universities of Deakin, Macquarie and Sydney. He was also awarded an AM in the Australian Bicentenary Honours list.

Williams was elected as a Fellow member of the Australian Academy of Science in 1993 and in 1994, he took up a Reuters Fellowship at Oxford University. He is a fellow of the Australian Academy of Science and a visiting professor at the University of NSW.

His ten books include the novel 2007, A True Story Waiting to Happen (Hodder Headline, 2002).

He has developed his essay ‘God’s only excuse’ published in Griffith Review 8: People Like Us into a book, Unintelligent Design, was published by Allen & Unwin in 2007.

This author has contributed 4 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Cassandra Pybus is a writer and historian and the author of eleven books including the controversial biography The Devil and James McAuley (UQP, 1999), which won the Adelaide Festival Award for Non Fiction in 2000 and Black Founders (New South, 2006).

She is currently Australian Research Council Professorial Fellow at the University of Sydney and, when not in Sydney or various cities in the United States, lives in Hobart.

In 2013 she will be Leverhulme Visiting Professor in History at King’s College London.

This author has contributed 2 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Mark Dapin's Strange Country (Macmillan, 2008) was (briefly) an Australian travel bestseller.

His first novel, King of the Cross (2009), won the Ned Kelly Award for Best First Fiction. His second novel, Spirit House (2011), was longlisted for the 2012 Miles Franklin Award.

He writes for the Adelaide Advertiser.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Peter Sutton is a Professional Fellow at the University of Adelaide and the South Australian Museum, and author of twelve books including Dreamings: the Art of Aboriginal Australia (George Braziller, 1988) and Native Title in Australia: an Ethnographic Perspective (Cambridge University Press, 2004). His forthcoming books are The Politics of Suffereing and Wik Sculptures.

He is the author of twelve books including Dreamings: the Art of Aboriginal Australia (George Braziller, 1988) andNative Title in Australia: an Ethnographic Perspective(Cambridge University Press, 2004). His forthcoming books are The Politics of Suffering and Wik Sculptures.

Peter is an anthropologist and linguist. He has lived and worked with Aboriginal people in remote areas of Cape York Peninsula and the Northern Territory, but also in urban and rural centres, since 1969. He assisted with over fifty indigenous land claim cases in many different parts of Australia from 1979 through 2005.

This author has contributed 2 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

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