Carrie Tiffany is a former park ranger who lives in Melbourne where she works as an agricultural journalist and writer.

Her first novel, Everyman's Rules for Scientific Living (Picador 2006), was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Award and the Orange Prize for fiction (UK). Her new novel, Mateship with Birds, will be published in early 2012.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Geoff Page is a Canberra-based Australian poet who has published twenty-one collections of poetry as well as two novels, five verse novels and several other works including anthologies, translations and a biography of the jazz musician Bernie McGann.

He retired in 2001 from being head of the English Department at Narrabundah College in the ACT, a position he had held since 1974. He has run, in several cafés since 1994, what is now Poetry at The Gods, featuring poets from around Australia and occasionally 
overseas. A parallel monthly series, Jazz in Concert at The Gods, has been running since 2003.

He has won several awards, including the ACT Poetry Award, the Grace Leven Prize, the Christopher Brennan Award, the Queensland Premier’s Prize for Poetry and the 2001 Patrick White Literary Award. His book 1953 (UQP, 2013) was shortlisted in the 2014 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards.

This author has contributed 3 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Michael Newton received his Masters in Political Economy from the University of Sydney. He has led a peripatetic career, primarily in the media, arts and not-for-profit sectors. His search for secure and rewarding work continues.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Gay Lynch has worked as a teacher, librarian, editor and academic, and is now an independent research fellow at Flinders University. Her short stories have appeared in Best Australian Stories 2015, TEXT Journal 30 and Sleepers Almanac IX and X. She was shortlisted for the 2016 Fish Memoir Prize.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Andrew Sant’s most recent collection of poems is Fuel (Black Pepper, 2009).

Another of his prose pieces recently appeared in Best Australian Essays 2009.

He is currently Writing Fellow at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Tasos Markou has been a professional photographer since 2004, and currently works as a freelancer for a number of international publications. He is also a convenor of Crossroads, a volunteer-run photography workshop that provides artistic outlet, fosters integration and empowers the voiceless among locals and the refugee community in northern Greece.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Peter Swain recently retired from the position of International Programme Manager with Volunteer Service Abroad, New Zealand.

For the past twenty-five years he has worked throughout the island nations of the Pacific.

His doctoral dissertation was on the role of civil society in economic and social development in the Pacific.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Terry Flew is Professor of Communication and Creative Industries at the Queensland University of Technology. He is the president of the International Communication Association, and the author of several books, including Understanding Global Media (Palgrave, 2018), and Media Economics (Palgrave, 2015), co-authored with Stuart Cunnningham and Adam Swift. He is currently at work on a book about regulating digital platforms.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Matthew Lamb was born and raised in Rockhampton, Queensland. He now lives in Hobart, Tasmania, and is the founding editor of the Review of Australian Fiction.

Matthew is on the steering committee for the 2013 Tasmanian Writers Festival and is also a consulting editor for Island magazine, Tasmania’s own quarterly of ideas and writing.

‘Long grass over home’ won the 2012 Josephine Ulrick Literature Prize.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Julie Green lives on the outskirts of Sydney and studies at Macquarie University. Next year she will undertake a written-production Honours component.

She mostly writes creative non-fiction on science and medicine, but has also focussed on visual arts and wildlife conservation. She currently writes for a local newspaper.

In her spare time, Julie bushwalks or draws and paints. She is an amateur artist and sells her work for pretty pennies. She has won awards for drawing, photography and a short film.

She is working on a short memoir piece about her grandmother's struggle with Alzheimer’s and will turn it into a bigger project in the future.

This author has contributed 7 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

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