Kristi Mansfield is a published commentator and leader in the technology industry, with a history of innovation within Sydney’s philanthropic, not-for-profit and social sectors. Named one of the Australian Financial Review's 100 Women of Influence in 2015, Kristi is now director of strategy in the Asia Pacific for a global technology company. She holds a BA Communications and a Masters in Philanthropy and Social Investment.

This author has contributed 3 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Professor Peter Stanley of UNSW Canberra was formerly the principal historian at the Australian War Memorial and is the author of thirty books, mainly on Australian military history.

His latest is Armenia, Australia and the Great War (NewSouth, 2016), co-authored with Vicken Babkenian.

This author has contributed 3 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Mandy Sayer is the author of ten works of fiction and non-fiction. Her most recent book is The Poet’s Wife (Allen & Unwin, 2014), a memoir.  She is the 2014 CAL Non-Fiction Writer-in-Residence at the University of Technology, Sydney. 

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Dr Muriel Porter is a leading laywoman in the Anglican Church of Australia, where she is a member of the General Synod and its Standing Committee. She was a leader in the struggle for women's ordination in Australia.

A former academic, she is a Melbourne journalist, commentator and author.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Phil Brown is a senior writer with Brisbane News.

He is the author of two books of poetry, Plastic Parables (1991) and An Accident in the Evening (2001) and two humorous memoirs, Travels with My Angst (2004) and Any Guru Will Do (2006), both published by UQP.

He is a former chairman of the Brisbane Writers' Festival and is now writing a novel based on his childhood in Hong Kong.

His essays have been published in Griffith REVIEW.

This author has contributed 6 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Kate Fitzpatrick has travelled widely, living in Europe for several years. She has written three books – the most recent Name Dropping in 2004 and Airmail in 2005 and has been a regular contributor to newspapers and magazines since the mid seventies.

She has worked as a political speech writer, a florist and is currently employed by the ABC's Legal Services Department. She was awarded the Queen's Jubilee Medal for services to the theatre and has recently completed an Arts degree.

Kate has a seventeen year old son named Joe and they live together in Sydney.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Victor Marsh is a research fellow in the department of creative writing within the School of English, Media Studies and Art History at the University of Queensland. 

His memoir, The Boy in the Yellow Dress, will be published by Clouds of Magellan in 2014, and was extracted in Griffith REVIEW 43: Once Upon a Time in Oz.

This author has contributed 2 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Shane Strange is an Ipswich-based writer & reviewer.

His fiction has appeared in various print and on line journals.

He is currently studying a Master of Writing at Deakin University.

This author has contributed 3 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

In a career spanning three decades Michael Gawenda has won numerous journalism awards, including three Walkley Awards.

He is the author of American Notebook: A Personal and Political Journey (2007) and Rocky and Gawenda: The Story of a Man and His Mutt (2009), both published by MUP.

He was the inaugural director of the Centre for Advanced Journalism at the University of Melbourne, where he is now a senior research fellow.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Ian Townsend was born in country New South Wales, but he has spent much of the past 20 years in Queensland, and the past eight years in Brisbane.

He's been a newspaper and radio journalist for more than two decades. He is currently a Brisbane reporter ABC Radio National's Background Briefing award-winning radio documentary program.

Ian's won a number of awards for journalism, including two national Eureka Prizes, sponsored by the Australian Museum. In August 2005, he won the Pfizer Australia Eureka Prize for Health and Medical Research Journalism, and in 1999 won the Eureka for science, technology and engineering journalism.

Affection, his first novel, was published in May 2005 by Fourth Estate, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers. TheDevil's Eye, also by Fourth Estate, was published in September 2008.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

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