Alex Reilly is a professor of law and the director of the Public Law & Policy Research Unit at the University of Adelaide. He researches, teaches and writes in the areas of migration law and policy, citizenship and identity, constitutional law, and Indigenous legal issues.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Dennis Atkins is the national affairs editor with The Courier Mail in Brisbane. He was born in the Adelaide Hills and started his forty-year career as a political journalist and commentator with News Limited in that city.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Cheryl Kernot is the  first Director of Teaching and Learning at the Centre for Social Impact (CSI), a unique partnership between Business Schools of the University of New South Wales, the University of Melbourne and Swinburne University of Technology.

Cheryl was Leader of the Australian Democrats from 1993-1997 and the Member for Dickson and a Labor Shadow Minister from 1998-2001.

Following her distinguished political career, Cheryl spent five years working in the UK as a Programme Director at the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at the Said Business School at Oxford University and as the Director of Learning at the School for Social Entrepreneurs in London. Her specialist role at the Skoll Centre was to assist and mentor start-up social businesses particularly in the delivery of innovative health services

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Dr Fiona Paisley is Deputy Director of the Centre for Public Culture and Ideas, Griffith University.

She is the author of Loving Protection? Australian Feminism and Aboriginal Women’s Rights, 1919-1939, and numerous articles on gender, internationalism, and settler colonial history.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Stephen Stockwell is an Associate Professor in journalism and communication at Griffith University's School of Arts.

His most recent book is Political campaign strategy: doing democracy in the 21st century (Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2005), and he has recently published papers on spin doctors, alternative media in Brisbane and rethinking communication theory.

This author has contributed 2 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Mark Peel teaches in the school of historical studies at Monash University.

He is the author of Good Times, Hard Times: The Past and the Future of Elizabeth (1995), A Little History of Australia (1997), and the Lowest Rung: Voices of Australian Poverty (2003), as well as chapters and articles in the areas of social justice, disadvantage, welfare, poverty, gender and class.

His most recent project examines the encounters between social workers and their clients in Melbourne, London and three American cities during the 1920s and 1930s. With the working title of Miss Cutler and the Case of the Reincarnated Horse, the book explores the different ways in which social work changed from a form of detection to a form of advocacy.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Tony Davis is based in Sydney. His books include The Big Dry (HarperCollins, 2013), a novel shortlisted in the 2014 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards; Roland Wright (a children’s series published in the US and Germany); Wide Open Road (ABC Books, 2011), the companion book to the ABC documentary; Total Lemons (ABC Books, 2012); and the literary memoir F. Scott, Ernest and Me (Bantam, 2007).

This author has contributed 2 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Chris Armstrong is a writer of poetry and fiction with work published in Overland, Eureka and Cordite, as well as regional anthologies. She won second prize in the 2015 Overland Judith Wright Poetry Prize and in 2014 was awarded an ASA Emerging Writers Mentorship for her first poetry manuscript, The Watershed.

This author has contributed 2 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Eleanor Limprecht is the author of three novels: The Passengers (Allen & Unwin, 2018), Long Bay (Sleepers, 2015) and What Was Left (Sleepers, 2013), which was shortlisted for the ALS Gold Medal.

Her short fiction has been published in Best Australian Stories, Kill Your Darlings, Sydney Noir, The Big Issue and The Sleepers Almanac.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Anna Rose is an environmentalist, freelance writer and author of Madlands: A Journey to Change the Mind of a Climate Sceptic (MUP, 2012).

She co-convenes the Vice-Chancellor's course in Leadership & Influence at Australia National University and serves as a director of the Bob Brown Foundation and Green Music Australia.

Anna is co-founder and former Chair of the Australian Youth Climate Coalition, a movement of 80,000 young Australians.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Griffith Review