James Arvanitakis, based at the University of Western Sydney, researches in the transdisciplinary areas of globalisation, citizenship, young people, security and the cultural commons – incorporating issues around hope, trust, safety and intellect.

Having held various position within human rights-based organisations including AID/WATCH and Oxfam Hong Kong, his research seeks to maintain a particular focus on issues of social justice.

He has also worked with playwrights and artists to document stories of injustice such as the production of Maralinga which records the stories of nuclear veterans.

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Kate Cole-Adams is a writer and journalist. She lives with her family in Melbourne.

Walking to the Moon is her first novel, and was shortlisted in the Victorian Premier's Literary Awards (Prize for an Unpublished Manuscript) in 2006. It was published by Text Publishing in 2008.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Ric Spencer is an artist and writer. He is currently the curator of Fremantle Arts Centre.

From 2004–10 he was the art critic at the West Australian newspaper, and from 2000–10 he was an academic at the School of Design and Art at Curtin University, where he holds a doctorate of creative arts and is currently adjunct professor.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Since leaving the US in 1999, Heather Taylor Johnson has found a home in Adelaide, where she earned a PhD in Creative Writing and lives with Dash, her three children – Guthrow, Sunny and Matilda – and their dog, Tom.

She is a poetry editor for Wet Ink magazine and the author of the poetry collection Exit Wounds.

Recently she has decided that she adores writing reviews, and has done so for Cordite, Mascara, Overland, Wet Ink and Independent Weekly.

This author has contributed 5 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Dr Fiona Paisley is Deputy Director of the Centre for Public Culture and Ideas, Griffith University.

She is the author of Loving Protection? Australian Feminism and Aboriginal Women’s Rights, 1919-1939, and numerous articles on gender, internationalism, and settler colonial history.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Since 2000, Malcolm Knox has published six books including the novels Summerland and A Private Man, winner of a Ned Kelly Award and a finalist in seven other Australian and international prizes. His non-fiction book Secrets of the Jury Room won an Alex Buzo prize for research and was serialised on ABC Radio.

He started work at the Sydney Morning Herald as a cadet journalist in 1994, after studying at the Universities of Sydney and St Andrews. He has held a number of positions at the SMH including chief cricket correspondent from 1996 to 1999, assistant sport editor from 1999 to 2000 and literary editor from 2002 to 2006.

As literary editor, he broke the story of the fake Jordanian memoirist, Norma Khouri, which won him a Walkley Award (Investigative Journalism category) in 2004. His newspaper and magazine journalism has been published in Australia, the USA, the UK and several other countries.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Chris Masters is a reporter with Four Corners and the author of the award winning, Jonestown (Allen and Unwin, 2006).

Masters was educated at Macquarie Boys High School, Parramatta, and after completing his Leaving Certificate, he joined the Australian Broadcasting Corporation the following year.

He commencing working on ABC television's flagship public affairs program Four Corners in 1983 and has since become the program's longest serving reporter. His first program was the landmark "Big League", a 1983 investigation of judicial corruption, which helped bring about the Street Royal Commission.

He is a Gold Walkley Award winner, for his 1985 Four Corners report "French Connections" about the infamous sinking of the Rainbow Warrior. Another famous Four Corners report by Masters, "The Moonlight State" from 1987, led to the Fitzgerald Inquiry into corruption in Queensland.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Rodney Crisp is an international insurance and risk management consultant, based in Paris. For many years he was the international director of continental Europe's leading insurance broking group, Gras Savoye, prior to creating the international subsidiary of the Joliez Regol insurance broking group quoted on the Paris Stock Exchange. Rodney was born in Cairns and raised in Dalby on the Darling Downs where his family has been established for well over a century and which he still considers as home. He writes in order to understand.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Marian Edmunds is a journalist who worked at the Financial Times in London and other UK and US-based publications for 18 years before returning to the Northern NSW town where she grew up.

Marian is currently a contributor to The Australian Financial Review.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Ella Mudie is an arts writer living in Sydney.

Her articles and essays on the visual arts, design, photography and other subjects have appeared locally in newspapers including The Age and various independent art magazines and internationally she has written forLeonardo (MIT Press) and Afterimage.

She is a graduate of the University of Sydney and the postgraduate journalism school at the University of Technology, Sydney.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

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