Darryl Kickett is a Nyungar man from Narrogin. He has managed community organisations serving land and primary health care needs, and was head of the Curtin University Centre for Aboriginal Studies. He currently leads community research for the Ancestors’ Words project.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Jack Waterford is editor-in-chief of The Canberra Times.

He has been a journalist for 31years, having written primarily about law, politics and public administration.

He has a degree in law from the Australian National University and was the 1985 Graham Perkin Australian Journalist of the Year for his work on Freedom of Information Act legislation.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Lucy Lehmann is the author of The Showgirl and the Brumby (Vintage, 2002).

A novelist by day, she first began playing music publicly in 2005 and continues to do so.

She is currently working on developing other literary works.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Jim Morrison is a senior Noongar man, a traditional custodian of Western Australia's pristine southern coast. 

He has been operating in a range of pivotal roles dealing with Aboriginal advancement for over three decades.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

David Walker is Alfred Deakin professor of Australian Studies at Deakin University and BHP Billiton chair of Australian Studies at Peking University, Beijing.

His prize-winning history, Anxious Nation: Australia and the Rise of Asia, 1850–1939 (UQP, 1999), has been translated into Chinese and Hindi. His memoir, Not Dark Yet: a personal history (Giramondo, 2011), has been translated into Chinese by Professor Li Yao and published by the People’s Literature Publishing House, Beijing.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Graeme Gibson has worked extensively as an adult educator and facilitator, primarily in the community services and environment sectors. This came after earlier stretches working in a bank and then mowing lawns.

Writing is an increasing focus, particularly essay, with public issues and nature/ place writing being of special interest. Graeme also presents writing workshops. He is completing a post graduate writing program at Swinburne. 

He has self-published, Beyond Fear and Loathing: local politics at work, a book based on personal experience from where he lives, at Jervis Bay on the NSW south coast. Some of his work is at www.morethanjusttalk.com.au

 

 

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Ashleigh Young is a writer and editor currently living in Wellington, New Zealand.

Her first book of poems, Magnificent Moon (Victoria University Press) was published in 2012.

Her essays and poems have appeared in Sport, Landfall, Turbine, Booknotes, and Hue & Cry.

She blogs at eyelashroaming.com

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Michael Wilding is emeritus professor of English and Australian Literature at the University of Sydney.

His books include Milton's Paradise Lost (Sydney University Press, 1969), Dragon Teeth: Literature in the English Revolution (Clarendon Press, 1987), The Paraguayan Experiment (Penguin, 1985), a documentary novel about the New Australia settlement, and most recently Academia Nuts (Wild & Wooley, 2nd edition 2003), a swan song for the campus novel.

This author has contributed 2 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Mark Dapin's Strange Country (Macmillan, 2008) was (briefly) an Australian travel bestseller.

His first novel, King of the Cross (2009), won the Ned Kelly Award for Best First Fiction. His second novel, Spirit House (2011), was longlisted for the 2012 Miles Franklin Award.

He writes for the Adelaide Advertiser.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Josh Chiat is a sports journalist based in Kalgoorlie-Boulder at the Kalgoorlie Miner. He has a first-class honours degree from the University of Western Australia in history and communication studies.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

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