Events

Edinburgh International Book Festival

Legacy of Empire

Celebrations of the Commonwealth Games were soured by the treatment of the Windrush Generation, highlighting the UK’s increasingly fraught relationship with its former colonies. In January Australia’s leading literary journal, Griffith Review, invited writers from around the world to offer a non-western centric perspective. Join the edition’s editor and Griffith Review‘s publisher Julianne Schultz, British publisher Margaret Busby and international writers Karen Lord and Salil Tripathi to examine Britain and its reputation abroad.

When: 7.30–9 pm, Monday 13 August
Where: Garden Theatre, Book Festival Village, Charlotte Square Gardens, Edinburgh
Tickets: £10–12 (online)


Paul Ham – Making of a Monster

Historian Paul Ham has written about Vietnam and Hiroshima, but in his most recent work he tackles one of the thorniest stories of them all: the moments and motivations that shaped Adolf Hitler and laid the foundations for the terrors unleashed in the 1930s and 40s. While Germany’s First World War defeat weighed heavily on him, the seeds of his hatred were planted much earlier. Chaired by Julianne Schultz.

When: 11 am–12 pm, Wednesday 15 August
Where: Garden Theatre, Book Festival Village, Charlotte Square Gardens, Edinburgh
Tickets: £10–12 (online)


Searching for the Soul of a Nation

Thirty years after his celebrated memoir White Boy Running, acclaimed South African writer Christopher Hope is here with The Café de Move-on Blues, an attempt to understand his post-Apartheid nation. He’s joined by leading indigenous Australian writer Bruce Pascoe, whose extraordinary, award-winning book Dark Emu demonstrates that the Aboriginal people of Australia enjoyed a sophisticated society whose history has been radically underplayed in colonial retellings. Chaired by Julianne Schultz.

When: 11 am–12 pm, Thursday 16 August 2018
Where: Garden Theatre, Book Festival Village, Charlotte Square Gardens, Edinburgh
Tickets: £10–12 (online)

Griffith Review